HABITAT RESTORATION & SEA LEVEL RISE

Tiscornia Marsh Project

This nature-based adaptation project will address potential flooding and habitat degradation along San Rafael’s Canal area shoreline, focusing on the Tiscornia Marsh.

Tiscornia Marsh

Adaptation
Project

2022 Community Forum

Building on the preliminary design produced by Environmental Science Associates (ESA) with a grant from the Marin Community Foundation, the Tiscornia Marsh Restoration and Sea Level Rise Adaptation Project will advance the design for restoring marsh habitat and improving the levee, connecting with the community, improving a public trail, and completing an environmental review.  The project design will include restoring an eroded section of the existing tidal marsh, opening the diked marsh to tidal action, stabilizing and improving a section of the degraded levee to increase flood protection for the community, and providing a transition zone habitat for wildlife and flood control. 

Overview
The Tiscornia project is funded by a grant to the Marin Audubon Society from 2016 Measure AA, the Clean and Healthy Bay Measure, managed by the San Francisco Bay Restoration Authority.
SFBRA

The San Francisco Bay Regional Authority funds projects that restore, protect, and enhance wetlands and wildlife habitats along San Francisco Bay and its shoreline. Learn more here.

MAS

The Marin Audubon Society (MAS) will manage and lead the project. Learn more about MAS here.

Why is the project needed?
¿Por qué es necesario el proyecto?

Presentation by youth outreach workers

Youth Outreach

Discover

The Tiscornia Marsh Project includes opportunities for youth to explore sea level rise, learn about the potential impacts on their communities, and promote youth participation by documenting changes in the current living shorelines.

Conserve
By restoring and enhancing naturally occurring shoreline features, this project is designing and testing sustainable defenses against sea level rise, as one of many approaches to protect some of Marin’s most underserved and vulnerable regions such as San Rafael’s Canal community and surrounding neighborhoods.
Change
The California State Coastal Conservancy and the Marin Community Foundation are supporting a ​series of innovative projects that are developing and testing nature-based solutions ​to protect shorelines and adapt to sea level rise in Marin County. Join us and be part of the change.

About

Tiscornia Marsh Project

This project will address potential flooding and habitat degradation along San Rafael’s Canal area shoreline, focusing on the Tiscornia Marsh.

Current Habitat Loss

The tidal marshlands at Tiscornia have eroded over the past 30 years, retreating as much as 200 feet with approximately 3 acres lost. The loss of habitat is significant for the endangered Ridgway’s Rail and many migratory shorebirds as well as for residents as the marsh is a buffer against bay waters flooding the canal. Existing and new data will be used to develop solutions to create a nature-based buffer against sea level rise, preserve critical wildlife habitat, and connect the top of the levee with the Bay Trail.

Projected Water Levels

Water levels in the San Francisco Bay may rise eight inches by 2035, and sixteen inches by 2050. San Rafael’s downtown and canal-fronting neighborhoods are among the most vulnerable. Bahia Vista Elementary and the Albert J. Boro Community Center both critical assets for the Canal could each face up to two feet of flooding in the future. The project will provide critical education to the Canal neighborhood about the potential impacts of sea level rise within the community and involve residents in adaptation planning and implementation of solutions. 

Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

Human activity causes heat-trapping gases which have increased global average temperatures by 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit since the 1880s. The majority of the warming has occurred since 1975.

Shrinking glaciers and ice sheets are adding water to the world’s oceans.

Shrinking glaciers and ice sheets are adding water to the world’s oceans.

Sea water expands as its temperature rises.

Sea level rise is accelerating.

Current and projected sea levels

– 2100

12-48 inches

– 2050

6-16 inches

– Today

8 inches

Sea level rise is accelerating.

Current and projected sea levels

– 2100

12-48 inches

– 2050

6-16 inches

– Today

8 inches

How to Help

Prevent Climate Change

Start Small

The little things make a difference – planting trees, and buying local produce helps lesson carbon footprint.

Reduce Waste

Help reduce greenhouse emissions by composting, practicing regular recycling, buying recycled goods, and buying less or in bulk to lessen packaging waste.
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Take Action

Be informed pay attention to politics and vote.

Save Energy

Use less energy by turning off appliances when not in use, switching to energy-saving bulbs, and investing in energy-saving appliances/objects.

Travel Green

1/3 of the world’s gas emissions are because of vehicles, therefore, ditching your car and walking or riding public transport helps lessen them.

Clean Energy

Try using renewable energy from time to time by installing solar panels and generating your own energy. The use of solar-powered objects is good too.

Reduce Beef Consumption

Eating less meat can help reduce pressure on forests and land used to grow animal feed, reduces the amount of methane gas that goes into the atmosphere and protects biodiversity and the earth’s ecosystems.

Nature-Based Restoration

The Marsh Currently

Key

Flood Risk

Flood Risk

Sea Rise

Sea Rise

1957 - 1987

Sea Rise

Sea Rise

1988 - 2017

Levee

Levee

After the Project

Key

New Levee

New Levee

Lowered Levee

Lowered Levee

Gravel Beach

Gravel Beach

Upland Transition

Upland Transition

Raised Levee

Raised Levee

Tidal Channels

Tidal Channels

Restored Marsh

Restored Marsh

Comments & Feedback

Comentarios

Project made possible by:

Ocean Protection Council